Book of Hours, Latin; opening of Matins in the Hours of the Virgin with historiated initial ‘D’ showing St. Anne teaching the Virgin. England (London), ca. 1410 (ff. 2–9 only), Flanders, ca. 1470, with adaptations done in England, f.9r

Book of Hours, Latin; opening of Matins in the Hours of the Virgin with historiated initial ‘D’ showing St. Anne teaching the Virgin. England (London), ca. 1410 (ff. 2–9 only), Flanders, ca. 1470, with adaptations done in England, f.9r
Christian Teaching
Image by Dunedin Public Libraries Medieval Manuscripts
126 leaves. 180 by 125mm. Single column. Part one (Flemish) in 20 lines, ruled in black ink, written space 105 x 69mm. Part two (English) in 20 lines, ruled in red ink, written space 104 by 70mm. Part three (English) in 17 lines, ruled in brown ink, written space 124 x 7.3mm.

Note: The book is formed of three distinct components, of which the core is a Flemish Book of Hours, ca. 1470 (see Manion/Vines/de Hamel pp. 84-85, No. 61).
Binding: Quires housed in a twentieth-century case.
Provenance: Made in Flanders, presumably Bruges, for the English market. Known as the Fitzherbert Hours, the book was owned by Margery Fitzherbert, whose name is incorporated no fewer than six times in prayers on three leaves. According to Alexandra Barratt, Margery Fitzherbert (née Babington) was married to John Fitzherbert of Etwall, the second son of the tenth lord of Norbury. The Fitzherberts were a prominent legal and, later, recusant family from Derbyshire. The manuscript passed to their daughter, Barbara, who married Sir Thomas Cokayne of Ashbourne, and then to her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Cokayne, whose inscription on folio 125v reads: Elyzabethe Cokayn of ov[er]ton undr Ardenne [now Orton-on-the-Hill] in the countye of Ley’t [Leicestershire] Wydowe ys the true honer of this booke’. Barratt notes that Elizabeth’s husband, Thomas, died in 1546.
A cutting from a nineteenth-century English book dealer’s catalogue present on the front flyleaf notes an ‘old Beaufort bookplate’, but the manuscript is not identifiable among those of the dukes of Beaufort. Affixed to the verso of the front flyleaf is the armorial bookplate of William Ridley Richardson (b. 1856) of Ravensfell and Bromley House in Kent. The manuscript was sold by Sotheby’s, 31 March 1952, lot 8, to ‘Garthwaite’. It was purchased for the Reed collection from E. Markham, Darlington, Durham, in November 1954.
References: Manion, Vines, de Hamel no. 61; Reed Early Bibles no. 18; M. Orr. ‘The Fitzherbert Hours (Dunedin Public Libraries, Reed MS 5) and the Iconography of St. Anne Teaching the Virgin to Read in Early Fifteenth-Century England’ in Migrations: Medieval Manuscripts in New Zealand edited by Stephanie Hollis and Alexandra Barratt (Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007), 216–46; The Medieval Imagination: Illuminated Manuscripts from Cambridge, Australia and New Zealand edited by Bronwyn Stocks and Nigel Morgan (South Yarra, Victoria: Macmillan Art Publishing, 2008), no. 47; A. Barratt. ‘Keep it in the Family: Researching Women and their Books of Devotion’ in Imagination, Books & Community in Medieval Europe edited by Gregory Kratzmann (South Yarra, Victoria: Macmillan Art Publishing, 2009), 153–54.
Shelfmark: RMM MS 5.

Description reproduced from Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in New Zealand Collections (London, 1989) by permission of the authors (Christopher de Hamel, Margaret Manion, and the family of Vera F. Vines).

Ms provenance expanded upon by Alexandra Barratt (University of Waikato).

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Yuriy Borshchenko

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