O Magnum Mysterium – Morten Lauridsen – Kings College

Probably the best and most moving piece of music I have ever heard. I was lucky enough to be able to watch this on “Carols from Kings” on Christmas Eve 2009 and it left me in tears. The beauty of the harmonies and the control of Kings College Choir transcends all words and I was left in a state of shock quivering and speechless. I have never heard anything like this in all my life! I never want it to end!

Boston – Freedom Trail: Kings Chapel

Boston – Freedom Trail: Kings Chapel
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Iohanni Lowell

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Iohanni Lowell
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)

Boston – Freedom Trail: King’s Chapel

Boston – Freedom Trail: King’s Chapel
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Henry Wilder Foote

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Henry Wilder Foote
christian theology
Image by wallyg
On December 22, 1861, Henry Wilder Foote was ordained as minister of King’s Chapel. Although the Chapel took no position on the issue of slavery until the Civil War was declared, Reverend Henry Wilder Foote and the congregation as a whole participated in Reconstruction efforts. As early as 1868, King’s Chapel raised money for the education of freedmen in the south, supporting such institutions as the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, the Calhoun Colored School, and the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute. The Chapel endowed the Mary Foote Hospital at Hampton and supported a scholarship fund for Indian children at Tuskegee.

King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Reverend Ephraim Peabody

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Reverend Ephraim Peabody
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Reverend Francis William Pitt Greenwood, D.D.

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Reverend Francis William Pitt Greenwood, D.D.
christian theology
Image by wallyg
Reverend Francis William Pitt Greenwood, clergyman (1797-1843) was ordained pastor of the New South Church in 1818. He resigned in 1820 on account of failing health, and, after a year in Europe, went to Baltimore, where he edited the " Unitarian Miscellany" for two years. He returned to Boston in 1824, andbecame Dr. Freeman’s colleague at King’s chapel, of which he was sole pastor from 1827 till his death. He visited Cuba for his health in 1837, and in that year and the following was associate editor of the "Christian Examiner." He revised the King’s Chapel liturgy in 1827.

King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)

Boston – Freedom Trail: King’s Chapel

Boston – Freedom Trail: King’s Chapel
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel was the first church in America to use an organ, bequeathed by a local merchant, Thomas Brattle, in 1713. The present organ, seen here in the gallery, is the Chapel’s sixth and was made by C.B. Fisk. The organ case is a reproduction of the case built for the Bridge Organ made in London for King’s Chapel and installed in this building in 1756. The crown and miters and the carvings are from the original case.

King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)