Fighting hardship: A Charitable Organization uses website to carry the troubled back from the brink

(PRWEB) June 10, 2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT

Charles S. Corey

Agape Love Corner

PO Box 3321

Champaign, IL. 61826-3321

Phone: 217-369-6181

Fax: 217-398-5998

Email: charles@agapelc.org

Web Site: www.agapelc.org

Champaign, Illinois (PRWEB) — Charles Corey, founder of Agape Love Corner Gift Shop, believes love/charity is the key to unlocking the closed doors of addiction. Corey has proven that determination and a strong spiritual foundation can bring anyone back from the brink.

Corey has created a Website at www.agapelc.org, where visitors can purchase Christian gifts from the comfort of their homes without the hassle of crowded stores; and have it delivered directly to their front door. “I received a revelation from God to setup a website to set free those who are in bondage through drugs”, says Corey. Customers have the option of sending a portion of the proceeds from their orders to someone in a treatment center or prison. Unlike most charitable programs, Agape allows participants to make a donation and receive a beautiful gift. It’s a win win program.

The company’s name and mission comes from John 3:16. Agape, meaning giving of yourself without yielding to a “What’s in it for me?” Attitude. This is the attitude that best describes Agape, which is unconditional love. Buy a gift for yourself or a loved one and help someone in need with a charitable gift, all in one act of giving. The site features over 4,000 Christian items including Figurines, Jewelry, and Bibles.

Also, from your act of charity, proceeds from purchased items go toward funding a rehabilitation center Corey hopes to establish. The center will be a place where people who have recently been released from jail — especially those with a history of substance abuse — can be counseled and prepared to re-enter society.

“I’ve come to find out, the only true way to counsel somebody is to lead them to Christ.” Corey said his dream for Agape Love Corner is to be a place of action and of investing in people’s lives.

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What’s the technique the church uses to make people attribute their guilt to skipping church?

Question by Dr. Mankitten: What’s the technique the church uses to make people attribute their guilt to skipping church?
How do they do it? How do they make people feel so much guilt upon skipping church? What’s the technique they employ to make people associate their innate guilt with church skipping? And to make people return to church with money.

Best answer:

Answer by MissDementia
It’s a passive-aggressive thing, I think.

Or just flat out playing on some people’s fears. If they skipped church they obviously need to bring money to give to the church next time they do attend. I think they get a better seat in their afterlife if they donate more.

Add your own answer in the comments!

Uses of internet in real life

Uses of internet in real life

there are real people to be found on the other end of the “intertubes.”Usage online and in fiction In an online setting, “real life” refers to life in the real world. It is generally used in reference to life or consensus reality, in contrast to an environment seen as fiction or fantasy, such as virtual reality, dreams, novels, or movies. Online, the acronym “IRL” stands for “in real life”, with the meaning “not on the Internet”.[1] In its use as a contrast of fictional worlds or fictional universes against the consensus reality of the reader, the term has a long history: ” Authors, as a rule, attempt to select and portray types rarely met with in their entirety, but these types are nevertheless more real than real life itself. ” —The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky[2] In its use for differentiating personal worlds created on the Internet from “offline” life, the term naturally has a much shorter history and a more unclear future. Sociologists engaged in the study of the Internet have theorized that someday a distinction between online and real-life worlds may seem “quaint”, noting that certain types of online activity, such as business transactions, have already made a full transition to complete legitimacy and “reality”.[3] “Real life” can be a controversial term, as it can serve as value judgement to describe “productive” activities, like work and the support of one’s family, in contrast to “unproductive” leisure activities. Indeed, outside of fictional worlds, the phrase is often used to contrast a more traditional way of living against a pejoratively depicted existence, such as academic life, in a manner similar to the term “real world”.[4] A person with experience in “real life” or the “real world” has experience beyond book learning. [edit]Related terminology The abbreviation “RL” stands for “real life”. For example, one can speak of “meeting in RL” someone whom one has met in a chat or on an Internet forum, or of an inability to use the Internet for a time due to “RL problems”. The phrase “in real life” is often similarly replaced with the acronym “IRL”. Some prefer the expression “face-to-face”, abbreviated “f2f”. Some Internet users use the idioms face time or meatspace, which contrasts with the term “cyberspace”.[5] [edit]Religious connotation “Real life” is also a synonym for the Christian understanding of eternal life—the outcome of being “born anew” or “born again” mentioned in the Bible (see John 3:7). In contemporary usage, it includes the notion of favorable “abundant” life (John 10:10), leading to its use in organisational names such as Real Life Church.[6] In this context, “real life” begins in this life by a personal decision to commit one’s life to Jesus’ rulership, overlaps this life until death, then continues beyond in the presence of a divine Creator. Because of this overlap, it is not spirit vs. flesh, as in ancient Greek philosophy, but an integration that elevates humanity beyond this life in substance and time (eternity).[peacock term] Christians believe Jesus inaugurated human eternal life by his resurrection (return to life), commemorated at Easter. [edit]Societal connotation “Real life” is also used to mean life after education or to mean adulthood or the world of adults as opposed to childhood or adolescence. “ROFLCon” is an Internet culture conference featuring Internet celebrities. About 800 of them gathered at MIT in Boston over the weekend for an Internet culture conference called ROFLCon. It was impossible to turn around without bumping into a meme, a meme-maker or a fan. Here were content providers and ceWebrities manifest in flesh and bone, giving new meaning to the term “live chat.” As the buzz of conversation escalated decibel levels just before Friday’s keynote address, a speaker approaching the podium caused a sudden hush. The mood was broken when someone shouted into the glaring silence, “This is what the Internet sounds like.” The laughter that followed set the tone for two days of panels marked by snarkiness, geek-love, and a level of audience participation worthy of “Web 2.0.” A certain amount of Net savvy was needed just to read the schedule. Topics included “Pwning for the Good of Mankind,” “Lolcats: I Can Has Case Study,” and “Incubating the Mind Virus: Meme Infrastructures.” First up was “You Can Get Paid for This?,” featuring the folks who gave us “Chuck Norris facts,” Marmaduke explained, the Million Dollar Homepage, the infamous “This Land” video mocking the 2004 presidential election, and video blog Rocket Boom. To a man — and as one audience member pointed out, most panelists were young, white males — they said their Internet fame was something of a fluke. And a few cited sheer boredom as their inspiration. Ian Spector, who some credit with resurrecting Chuck Norris’ career, said he started 4q, the “original” Chuck Norris fact generator, while “sitting home alone one Saturday night when all of my friends were out.” Don’t Miss The new fame: Internet celebrity Joe Mathlete, who meticulously deconstructs the Marmaduke comic, said he simply had nothing better to do at the office. ROFLCon organizer Diana Kimball speculated that much of what makes the Web “weird and whimsical” can be directly attributed to “procrastination,” as the people building sites, and surfing them, look to avoid what they really should be doing. Conference activities were punctuated by announcements to “check online” for details about evening concerts, live streams and special fan-base dinners. Kimball, who often stood at the microphone, said it felt odd talking about the Internet without being on the Internet. But even offline, conference attendees found ways to highlight their favorite Web-based in-jokes. The crowd outside one panel was “rickrolled” by a group of singers doing their best Rick Astley imitation. Watch more on “rickrolling.” All kidding aside, attendees were well aware that “The Internet is serious business,” as the saying goes. Ad sales and merchandise revenue were cited as the chief sources of income for many sites. Others are strictly a labor of love. David Lloyd, “DJ Pretzel” of OC Remix, said his site is a “dot org” rather than a “dot com” because, “We are definitely not for profit.” Later he asked his money-making co-presenters what he is doing wrong. Several panels focused on the elusive nature of commercial success online and the speakers tended to agree that it’s all about building community. In the months between its conception and execution, ROFLCon built its own community. For those not there “in real life”, there were constant “Twitters,” live blog updates and video streams of the events. As the conference came to a close, the hundreds who helped create what Kimball called “the Internet in person,” were buzzing about whether it would happen again next year. In the meantime, they’ve gone back to sitting at their computers, detached from each other by time and space, staring at inanimate screens and hoping.

drizharnium@gmail.com, Bangalore India

LifeChurch.tv uses Bluefish TV’s Video-driven Bible Study, Joseph: The Hard Life, in 1,000 Small Groups


LifeChurch.tv


Dallas, TX (PRWEB) August 19, 2008

LifeChurch.tv recently purchased the rights to use Bluefish TV’s video-driven Bible study, Joseph: The Hard Life in over 1,000 small groups within their church.

In Joseph: The Hard Life, Rob Duford, Pastor of Orlando North Community Church, teaches on the life of Joseph and the certain choices he made in his life. Using an ancient biblical story combined with modern-day characters, the four-part series outlines how Joseph spent a good part of his life rejected, abandoned, and imprisoned but the wise choices he made were what truly defined him and helped him overcome obstacles.

On each DVD of Joseph: The Hard Life that LifeChurch.tv distributes to their church, they recognize their partnership with Bluefish TV, directing 1,000 small groups to Bluefishtv.com to explore more resources.

“Bluefish TV studies have some of the highest quality content and production values that I’ve seen in a long time,” says Alan Danielson, Central Team Leader for LifeChurch.tv small groups.

LifeChurch.tv is known for being one of America’s most influential churches who skillfully integrates technology and media into their ministry. Craig Groeschel is the founding and senior pastor of LifeChurch.tv and is known for his creative and relevant Bible teaching. They have multiple campuses in six states that receive a simulcast of the message each week. The message is also streamed online for people to view on the internet.

“We are thrilled to partner again with LifeChurch.tv, and have appreciated the partnerships in the past with other organizations like FCA and Lakepointe in using our resources. We look forward to serving many other ministries in the future,” says Justin Forman, Vice President of Sales and Strategic Partnerships for Bluefish TV.

To explore Bluefish TV’s ever-popular and growing selection of video-driven Bible study resources, visit bluefishtv.com.

About Bluefish TV:

Bluefish TV is a non-profit Christian video ministry that has produced video sermon illustrations and small group Bible study resources for youth groups and pastors for over 25 years. Bluefish TV has worked with Christian leaders such as Erwin McManus, Louie Giglio, Donald Miller, Todd Phillips, Margaret Feinberg, Beth Moore, Doug Fields, Drs. Les and Leslie Parrott, Mercy Me, Chris Tomlin, David Crowder Jars of Clay and others to produce relevant resources for 93,000 churches across the country. Bluefish TV also has a passion and commitment to world missions and has participated in projects around the world to tell missionaries’ stories of faith and sacrifice.

You can view full video previews and purchase each small group study and video illustration at www.bluefishtv.com. Some Bluefish TV resources can also be found in stores and on the websites of their ministry partners: LifeWay, Cokesbury, Mardels, Family Christian and Simply Youth Ministries.

Contact:

Samantha Krieger

Writer/Content Editor

Samantha at bluefishtv.com

Bluefish TV/RightNow Campaign

972.560.5600

www.bluefishtv.com

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LifeChurch.tv Uses Bluefish TV’s Video-Driven Bible Study in 1,000 Small Groups



Dallas, TX (PRWEB) May 30, 2008

It can be difficult for churches to find relevant and quality video-driven resources to use in their small group ministry. For a long time, LifeChurch.tv had a problem finding the right kind of resources to use in their expanding ministry.

Bluefish TV understands the same dilemma and that is why they are producing creative and affordable small group video-driven studies. Several months ago, Bluefish TV mailed out sample resources to the top 100 most innovative churches across the country to introduce them to their small group resources. One of those churches was LifeChurch.tv based out of Oklahoma City. Alan Danielson, Central Team Leader for LifeChurch.tv small groups, contacted Bluefish TV intrigued and interested in learning more about their resources.

This month, LifeChurch.tv has decided to partner with Bluefish TV and purchase the rights to use the “Life of Nehemiah” study in over 1000 of their small groups. On the opening of each video, Alan Danielson introduces Bluefish TV and recognizes their partnership, directing 1,000 small groups to Bluefishtv.com for more resources. They are also discussing the use of two more studies later this summer.

“Bluefish TV studies have some of the highest quality content and production values that I’ve seen in a long time,” says Alan Danielson.

LifeChurch.tv is known for being one of America’s most influential churches who skillfully integrates technology and media into their ministry. Craig Groeschel is the founding and senior pastor of LifeChurch.tv and is known for his creative and relevant Bible teaching. His passion is to lead people to become fully devoted followers of Christ — which is the driving force behind his down-to-earth teaching that is touching thousands of people weekly. They have multiple campuses in six states that receive a simulcast of the message each week. The message is also streamed online for people to view on the internet.

Bluefish TV is excited that the door has been opened to be an effective resource for the small group ministry at LifeChurch.tv.

To explore Bluefish TV’s video-driven Bible study resources, visit bluefishtv.com.

About Bluefish TV:

Bluefish TV is a non-profit Christian video ministry that has produced video sermon illustrations and small group Bible study resources for youth groups and pastors for over 25 years. Bluefish TV has worked with Christian leaders such as Erwin McManus, Louie Giglio, Donald Miller, Todd Phillips, Margaret Feinberg, Beth Moore, Doug Fields, Drs. Les and Leslie Parrott, Mercy Me, Chris Tomlin, David Crowder Jars of Clay and others to produce relevant resources for 93,000 churches across the country. Bluefish TV also has a passion and commitment to world missions and has participated in projects around the world to tell missionaries’ stories of faith and sacrifice.

You can view full video previews and purchase each small group study and video illustration at www.bluefishtv.com. Some Bluefish TV resources can also be found in stores and on the websites of their ministry partners: LifeWay, Cokesbury, Mardels, Family Christian and Simply Youth Ministries.

Contact:

Justin Forman

VP of Sales & Strategic Partnerships

Bluefish TV/RightNow Campaign

972.560.5600

www.bluefishtv.com

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