The Internet, Freedom of Speech and the Anti-Gay App

The Internet, Freedom of Speech and the Anti-Gay App
Pressure is mounting on Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) to rid its store of an Anti-Gay App. Over at the Huffington Post, Wayne Bessen writes that Exodus International, the largest Christian organization offering a “cure” for homosexuality, is bragging that Apple gave it a 4+ rating, signifying the absence of “offensive content.”
Read more on Forbes

Muslim group talks Sharia
currently being debated in many states. Held in the Willard Building, about 20 people attended the meeting — some with little to no knowledge of Sharia.
Read more on Penn State Collegian

Kids wade into tough issues for History Day
COSTA MESA – Anyone who thinks the hot-button political issues of the day should only be discussed by grown-ups would have been blown away by the breadth of knowledge and creativity on display at Orange County ‘s National History Day competition Saturday.The 500 or so students from 4th…
Read more on Orange County Register

Boston – Freedom Trail: Kings Chapel

Boston – Freedom Trail: Kings Chapel
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Iohanni Lowell

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Iohanni Lowell
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)

Boston – Freedom Trail: King’s Chapel

Boston – Freedom Trail: King’s Chapel
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Christian Unschooling : Growing Your Children in the Freedom of Christ

Christian Unschooling : Growing Your Children in the Freedom of Christ

For too many years, the segment of homeschoolers that consider themselves “Christians” and “unschoolers” have been ignored. Many thought one couldn’t be both a Christian and an unschooler. But Teri Brown with Elissa Wahl expose that not only to Christian Unschoolers exist, they are growing in numbers. Through Christian Unschooling: growing your children in the freedom of Christ, the authors support Christian unschoolers everywhere–letting them know they are not alone. For those Christian parents who are facing school-at-home burnout form a strict schedule, they offer another path to learning.

Unschooling, child-led learning, free learning, interest based education, child-delighted learning–whatever you choose to call it, this book explains what unschooling is (and isn’t) in easy-to-understand terms while holding your hand as you walk the unschooling pathway.

Many essays of unschoolers are included–offering their viewpoints, “typical days”, opinions on lessons and learning, how they are guided by the Lord and much more.

Additionally, comprehensive information on starting an unschooling support group is included along with plenty of ideas to inspire you in the subjects of language arts, history, math, science and more.

List Price: $ 13.95

Price: $ 181.74

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Henry Wilder Foote

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Henry Wilder Foote
christian theology
Image by wallyg
On December 22, 1861, Henry Wilder Foote was ordained as minister of King’s Chapel. Although the Chapel took no position on the issue of slavery until the Civil War was declared, Reverend Henry Wilder Foote and the congregation as a whole participated in Reconstruction efforts. As early as 1868, King’s Chapel raised money for the education of freedmen in the south, supporting such institutions as the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, the Calhoun Colored School, and the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute. The Chapel endowed the Mary Foote Hospital at Hampton and supported a scholarship fund for Indian children at Tuskegee.

King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Reverend Ephraim Peabody

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Reverend Ephraim Peabody
christian theology
Image by wallyg
King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Reverend Francis William Pitt Greenwood, D.D.

Boston – Freedom Trail – Kings Chapel – Reverend Francis William Pitt Greenwood, D.D.
christian theology
Image by wallyg
Reverend Francis William Pitt Greenwood, clergyman (1797-1843) was ordained pastor of the New South Church in 1818. He resigned in 1820 on account of failing health, and, after a year in Europe, went to Baltimore, where he edited the " Unitarian Miscellany" for two years. He returned to Boston in 1824, andbecame Dr. Freeman’s colleague at King’s chapel, of which he was sole pastor from 1827 till his death. He visited Cuba for his health in 1837, and in that year and the following was associate editor of the "Christian Examiner." He revised the King’s Chapel liturgy in 1827.

King’s Chapel, along with its adjacent burial ground is the fifth stop along the Boston Freedom Trail. Founded by Royal Governor Andros of the Providence of New England, under the rule of King James II, on June 15, 1686, it is the oldest member church of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican church in New England. Today Kings Chapel is an independent Christian Church with a Unitarian Christian theology, an Anglican form of liturgy, and a congregational form of governance.

Its first house of worship was a small wooden meeting house at the corner of the present site at Tremont and School Streets, that was dedicated on June 30, 1689. The congregation grew and its building was in a bad state of repair by the middle of the 18th century. After difficult negotiations with Boston officials, the congregation acquired more land on the east side of its lot. The new, larger building was designed by the first American architect, Peter Harrison of Newport, in 1749 and completed in 1754.

National Register #74002045 (1974)