Saving Israel … Winner of the 2009 National Jewish Book Award …item 2.. Chumash Themes #21: Wars of the Jews — We only fight those who choose to fight us. (May 3, 2013 / 23 Iyar 5773) …

Saving Israel … Winner of the 2009 National Jewish Book Award …item 2.. Chumash Themes #21: Wars of the Jews — We only fight those who choose to fight us. (May 3, 2013 / 23 Iyar 5773) …
Bible Study Lessons
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Israel is beset from all sides. In the international community, it is the only country whose right to exists is still debated. Closer to home, many Arab leaders continue to call for its destruction. Inside its borders, Israel’s own Arab population grows ever more hostile. And now, countless Jews within Israel and around the world have begun to lose faith in the very idea of a Jewish state. Can Israel weather these challenges?
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…..item 1)…. Saving Israel: How the Jewish People Can Win a War That May Never End …

… Daniel Gordis … danielgordis.org/books

Winner of the 2009 National Jewish Book Award

danielgordis.org/books/saving-israel-how-the-jewish-peopl…

Israel is beset from all sides. In the international community, it is the only country whose right to exists is still debated. Closer to home, many Arab leaders continue to call for its destruction. Inside its borders, Israel’s own Arab population grows ever more hostile. And now, countless Jews within Israel and around the world have begun to lose faith in the very idea of a Jewish state. Can Israel weather these challenges?
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img code photo … Daniel Gordis, Saving Israel

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img code photo … National Jewish Book Awards Winner … Jewish Book Council

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In Saving Israel, Daniel Gordis offers a new defense of the Jewish state, asking first why Israel is necessary, and then discussing what Israel has to do in order to survive its enemies. Gordis begins with a novel discussion of Israel’s purpose, reflecting on the overlooked ways in which Israel has changed the existential condition of Jews everywhere. In the process, he grapples with controversial questions about Israel, Israeli Arabs, Muslims, and the International community that many Israelis and American Jews are loath to confront. Gordis lays to rest an array of pernicious myths about Israel:

… Jews in the United States could thrive without Israel

… Israeli Arabs just want equality, and Palestinians simply want their own state

… Peace will come, if Israel is willing to make appropriate territorial compromises

… Fighting and winning wars is antithetical to Judaism

Gordis suggestions for what Israel must do to survive, and more importantly, for how it must think if it is to have a future, are sure to arouse debate and even controversy. For Gordis’ book is a passionate reminder of Israel’s purpose, a celebration of what Israel has already accomplished, a renewal of faith in the cause, and a bold guide for carrying on the struggle. Saving Israel is a full-throated call to arms. Never has the case for defending the existence of Israel been made with such confidence, passion, and clarity.

—- Reviews

Few books can combine the sweep of Israel’s complex and extraordinary history with personal insight and passion. Saving Israel accomplishes this and more, it educates and inspires it readers while furnishing them with well-grounded hope for the future. Daniel Gordis has written an essential text for students, scholars, journalists–anyone concerned with the survival of the Jewish State.

–Michael Oren, Bestselling author of Six Days of War and Power, Faith and Fantasy: American in the Middle East, 1776 to the Present

Daniel Gordis’s morally powerful Saving Israel, from a writer whose reflections are consistently as intellectually impressive as they are moving, engages in an acutely necessary argument: that sovereignty has significantly changed the Jewish condition by influencing how we think. Gordis addresses the exigencies of our time with the urgency they overridingly demand, and with the depth of feeling they inspire.

–Cynthia Ozick

Daniel Gordis’ Saving Israel is an important book. Bold in his willingness to be forthright and politically incorrect, Gordis sets forth propositions which are difficult for many to accept, such as the fact that Israel’s existence is more important than peace and that Israel can never be a copy of the American style liberal democracy. For, as he notes, what is at stake is not merely a state, but the only Jewish State in 2000 years, and the very future of the Jews worldwide, including those who do not live in that State. Hopefully, Saving Israel will inspire constructive discussion and analysis of core issues that Israelis, Jews everywhere, (and the entire West) have studiously avoided for far too long.

–Natan Sharansky, Former Soviet dissident and Israeli Cabinet Minister; author of Defending Identity: Its Indispensable Role in Protecting Democracy

Daniel Gordis has written a book about the future of Israel that is both heart-wrenching and heart-warming. His has consistently been, these past few years, one of the most engaging voices to have emerged from this time of trial for the Jewish state, and it is impossible not to be moved by his plea for hope in the land whose very existence should be a living symbol of hope.

–Sir Jonathan Sacks, Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth

One of Israel’s most thoughtful observers

–Alan Dershowitz, author of The Case for Israel

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……item 2)…. Chumash Themes #21: Wars of the Jews …

… aish.com … www.aish.com/jl/b/

Home » Judaism 101 » The Bible » Themes In Chumash
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img code photo … Chumash Themes #21: Wars of the Jews

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The Torah innovation of “battlefield ethics.”

by Rabbi Zave Rudman
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www.aish.com/jl/b/chumash/Chumash-Themes-21-Wars-of-the-J…

Deuteronomy – chapters 20, 21, 23, 25:17-19

— Introduction

Everyone knows that the most popular Hebrew word is shalom, peace. Shalom is the final thought of the Amidah prayer, and the final thought of the Grace After Meals. Shalom is emphasized throughout Torah literature, and it is said that one of the names of God is Shalom.1
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img code photo … video Chumash Themes #21 … Jewish Wars: Protection of a Mitzvah

With Rabbi Eytan Feiner

media.aish.com/images/ChumashThemes21.jpg

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The Torah, however, does not ignore the fact that war is a fundamental part of human events. In the Torah, we see four types of war-related discussions:

… The laws of warfare, as described primarily in Deuteronomy chapters 20, 21 and 23.

… Wars that the Jews are commanded to wage – e.g. the war against Amalek (Deut. 25:17-19) and the war against the Canaanite nations (Deut. 7:1-2).

… Historical descriptions of wars – both internecine and external – that actually took place. These can be found starting with Abraham, throughout the Torah and into the prophets, ending with the description of the war with Babylon when the first Temple was destroyed.

…Prophecies about war in the Messianic era, and the place of battle at that time.

To get a better understanding of the Jewish perspective on war, let’s examine each of these four categories.

— The Laws of War

When the Torah presents laws for behavior on the battlefield, it is primarily coming to address the urges that are released when the “dogs of war” are let loose. When people are expected to negate the most basic of human instincts – self-preservation – and immerse in the inherent repugnance of killing, many of the fine points of what makes us human and Godlike can be swept away. So the Torah introduces into human consciousness the concept of “battlefield ethics,” to prevent the army and its soldiers from sinking into a state of depravity.

One of the first such laws is actually the prohibition against using iron to build the Temple altar. The verse says, “Do not build the altar of cut stones, since you have defiled it but utilizing your sword.”2 In many ancient and even medieval societies there was an intermingling between warriors and religion. With this law, the Torah very clearly delineates the difference between service of God – which is holy and merciful – and the bloodshed of war, which must be kept outside the Temple.

The reality is that war makes one callous and cruel. Therefore, since God Himself commanded the Jews to rid the land of evil, God likewise promised the soldiers that they would retain their compassionate nature. In the words of our parsha: “God will have compassion on you, and reverse any display of anger that might have existed.”3

The Book of Deuteronomy offers more intricate laws of how and when to go to battle, and how to treat an enemy and captured territory. For example:

… Deuteronomy 20:10 states the requirement to try to find a peaceful solution to any conflict. The verse says: "When approaching a town to attack it, first offer them peace." Only if their response is negative are you permitted to attack. Even then, the army is to allow the enemy an escape route should they desire to leave the battlefield.4

… Deuteronomy chapter 23 emphasizes how the laws of purity and cleanliness are to be kept even in the camp. Since it is quite common that soldiers experience a general lowering of civility, detailed laws are taught even about the construction of latrines

In halachic terms, there is another issue: It is forbidden to study Torah in the presence of human wastes.5 So by mandating proper latrines, the Torah is ensuring that even in the army, the obligation of Torah study continues – to help maintain the spiritual level of the soldiers. For after all, Jewish wars are ultimately won based not on tanks and planes, but on spiritual merits.

… Deuteronomy 20:19-20 teaches the prohibition against wanton waste in the context war. Battle is always the supreme waste of resources – money, materials, and even human beings. To not allow ourselves to become desensitized, the Torah teaches that when using the trees around the battlefield to construct fortifications, do not use fruit trees that could be utilized for food purposes.

— The Eglah Arufa

Deuteronomy chapter 21 presents an unusual law: The Torah says that if a corpse is found on an intercity road, and the murderer cannot be found, then the community leaders are to perform a ceremony where they take responsibility for the misdeed and ask forgiveness from God for the lawlessness in their area.
This law is a fascinating lesson in the degree of accountability the Torah requires from Jewish leaders.

This law is even more unusual considering its placement in the context of the (seeming unconnected) laws of war. One would think that when a country is at war, and pillage and destruction fill the land, one more corpse would hardly be noticed. So here the Torah is trying to heighten our sensitivities: One may be obligated to go to war and kill, but we must not become inured to the value of human life. As Golda Meir famously said, “We can forgive our enemies for killing our children, but not for turning our children into killers.”

This is the Jewish approach. War may be required, but only as a last resort, and without losing sight of the damage that can be brought to the soul of the soldier.

— Commanded Wars

The second discussion concerns the two times the Jewish people are actually commanded to go out and wage war. The first is against Amalek, and the second is regarding the conquest of the Land of Israel. These two have fundamentally different rationales, and therefore separate sets of laws.

The war against Amalek is a reaction to an unprovoked attack on the Jewish people. As the Jewish people travel through the desert, immediately after the Exodus from Egypt, they are ambushed by Amalek. Amalek is not worried about the Jews attacking them, nor are they interested in conquering the Jewish Land – we were nomads in the desert. They attacked in order to show the world that the Jews are just like all other nations and there is no need to take seriously the miraculous events of the Exodus and the splitting of the sea. This wanton and brazen attack earned Amalek the eternal enmity of God.

But beyond threatening the physical existence of the Jewish people, Amalek was primarily attacking the lofty spiritual ideals they had introduced to the world. The Jewish people demonstrated the concept of freedom from human slavery and subservience to God. The despots of the world cannot allow that. So Amalek attacks this idea and those who represent it. Therefore, the Jews are commanded to eradicate this opposition completely and totally from the world. A human could not make such a decision, but this is the Godly wisdom: By espousing such contempt for freedom and human worth, Amalek abdicates its place in the world.

The second commandment is the war to conquer the Land of Canaan. In this case, the Jews must first try to accomplish the acquisition in a peaceful manner, with war as only a final resort. Under the leadership of Moses, and then Joshua, the Jews send missives and letters, enjoining the Canaanites to either leave the land peacefully, or to stay in the land under Jewish auspices.6

This commandment needs to be put into perspective of the ownership of Israel. God had promised the land to Abraham and his descendents as an eternal possession.7 Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and the Twelve Tribes all lived in the land, but left temporarily during the Egyptian exile. When the Jewish people returned, they did not attack at first, but suggest that the usurping Canaanites return to their traditional homes. We only fight those who choose to fight us.

— Historical Wars

The third aspect of war discussed in the Torah is historical accounts of battles that took place. There are many, but it is interesting to note one specific battle that did not take place. In the beginning of the Book of Kings, there is a rebellion against the house of David. King Rechabam prepares to go to war against the rebels (see 1-Kings 12:23 on), when the prophet comes to him and stops the war. “You have no right to go to war against other Jews. This is not an enemy, but a brother.” Rechabam listens to the prophet, folds his army and returns home. The Torah is emphasizing that civil war is for only the most extraordinary circumstances.

The last aspect of war discussed in the Torah is regarding the Messianic era, exemplified by that immortal verse that is repeated twice in the prophets: “They shall beat their swords into plowshares.”8 There is no greater testimony to peace as the ultimate goal of Judaism.

On one hand, the Torah is realistic that in a world with enemies, one may need to go to battle. But war is not noble. It can be tolerated when needed. It must be directed to not get out of hand, and contained within Divine guidelines. We must keep the goals and dreams of the Jewish people firmly targeted toward bringing about a peaceful, civilized, God-conscious world.
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Jewish Pathways … Jewish Wars: Protection of a Mitzvah

video: 05:07 minutes

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The Goldhar School Presents: The Crash Course in Torah

Session 19 … Wars and Inheritance of the Lnad

YouTube video: 6:39 minutes

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1. Talmud – Shabbat 10b
2. Exodus 20:21
3. Deut. 13:18
4. Maimonides (Kings 6:4,5,7) with Kesef Mishnah
5. Orach Chaim 83:1 with Mishnah Berurah 5
6. Maimonides (Kings 6:5)
7. Genesis 15:18
8. Isaiah 2:4; Micha 4:3

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The destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem (Titus and the Roman legions in 70 CE) – painting by Francesco Hayez (1867) …item 3.. Josephus claims that 1,100,000 people were killed during the siege, of which a majority were Jewish and 97,000 captured.

The destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem (Titus and the Roman legions in 70 CE) – painting by Francesco Hayez (1867) …item 3.. Josephus claims that 1,100,000 people were killed during the siege, of which a majority were Jewish and 97,000 captured.
Bible Study Lessons
Image by marsmet543
The Tenth of Tevet marks the onset of the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, the King of Babylonia, and the beginning of the battle that ultimately destroyed Jerusalem and the Temple of Solomon, and sent the Jews into the 70-year Babylonian Exile.

The date of the Tenth of Tevet is recorded for us by the prophet Yechezkel, who himself was already in Babylonia as part of the first group of Jews exiled there by Nebuchadnezzar, 11 years earlier than the actual destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem itself.
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…..item 1)… aish.com … Siege of Jerusalem … The Tenth of Tevet is a Jewish fast day marking Nebuchadnezzar’s siege of Jerusalem 2,500 years ago.

What’s the message for us today?

January 5, 2012 / 10 Tevet 5772
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img code photo … Siege of Jerusalem

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by Rabbi Noah Weinberg

www.aish.com/h/10t/48960291.html

In Jewish consciousness, a fast day is a time of reckoning, a time to correct a previous mistake. What happened on the Tenth of Tevet that we have to correct?

On the Tenth of Tevet, 2,500 years ago, Nebuchadnezzar began his siege of Jerusalem. Actually, there was little damage on that first day and no Jews were killed. So why is this day so tragic? Because the siege was a message, to get the Jewish people to wake up and fix their problems. They failed, and the siege led to the destruction of the King Solomon’s Temple.

Today we are also under siege. Much of the Jewish world is ignorant of our precious heritage. Children whose Jewish education ended at age 13 now carry that perception through adulthood. The results are catastrophic: assimilation in the diaspora, and a blurring of our national goals in Israel.

The siege was a message, to get the Jewish people to wake up and fix their problems.

So what’s the message for us? Wake up and understand. What does the Almighty want? If there’s a siege, hear the message now. Don’t wait for the destruction.

If the Jewish problem today is a lack of appreciation of our heritage, then the solution is clear: increased love of Torah, love of Jews, and love of Israel and Jerusalem. The Almighty is telling us: The siege will not be lifted until you correct the mistake.

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—– RESPONSIBILITY TO TEACH

The Talmud speaks about two sages concerned over the threat of Torah being forgotten by the Jewish people. As a precaution, Rav Chiyah captured a deer, slaughtered it, and gave the meat to orphans. Then he tanned the hides and wrote five separate scrolls, one for each of the Five Books of Moses. He took five children, and taught each of them one book. He then took six more children, and taught each of them one of the six orders of Mishnah, the oral law.

Then he told each of the 11 children: Teach what you’ve learned to each other. With this, the Talmud says, Rav Chiyah ensured that the Torah would never be forgotten by the Jewish people.

This raises a question: 11 children is a pretty small class. Why didn’t Rav Chiyah simply teach all the children all the books? Why did he teach each child only one book?

The answer is that the children having to teach each other was essential to the process. To ensure that Torah should not be forgotten, you have to teach what you’ve learned to others. That’s the secret. You’ve got an obligation to your fellow Jews. If you know something — teach it.

To ensure that Torah should not be forgotten, you have to teach what you’ve learned to others.
Realize that the most destructive, painful, contagious disease of all is ignorance. Ignorance leads to wasted lives and untold suffering.

So if you know the key to happiness, teach it. Do you see human beings walking around depressed, half dead? Give them some joy. If you have the ability, you must help. Otherwise you’ll always bear the knowledge of what you "could have done."

This is not about "forcing your opinion" on others. No. A good teacher conveys information that allows the student to get in touch with what he already knows — and re-discover it on his own. Get others to see and understand it on their own terms.

Don’t sell yourself short. You have the ability to make a dramatic impact on others. You don’t have to be a U.S. Senator to make a difference. With one piece of wisdom you can help humanity.

—– SOVIET SYSTEM

The director of Aish HaTorah’s Russian Program is Rabbi Eliyahu Essas, a former refusenik from the Soviet Union. He lived there at a time when it was totally illegal to study Torah. Consequently, Rabbi Essas had nobody to teach him, and at the time, he didn’t know how to even read Aleph-Bet. So he got a hold of some underground books, hid out from the KGB, and began to teach himself Torah.

After awhile, word got out that Rabbi Essas knew Torah, and people started coming to study in secret. But of 5 million Soviet Jews, Rabbi Essas was one of the few teaching Torah. So you can imagine that his time was in great demand. That’s why Rabbi Essas made a rule: "Before I begin teaching you, you must agree to teach over what you’ve learned to others." In this way, Rabbi Essas was able to multiply his effect.

"Before I begin teaching you, you must agree to teach over what you’ve learned to others."

Although we don’t live under an oppressive Soviet regime, the concept still applies to us as well. You learned something precious? Say to yourself: "That was fascinating. How did it change me? What did it teach me about living? Now how can I transfer this insight to others?"

Don’t forget: Teaching benefits you as well. Until you share an idea, it’s not yours. It remains but a hazy notion in your imagination. Having to explain an idea to others forces you to clarify it for yourself. You’ve taken it out of potential and made it a reality.

When you teach someone, make sure they understand how important it is to teach it over to someone else. If they do, then that’s part of your success as a teacher. That’s ensuring that Torah would never be forgotten by the Jewish people.

—– ONE NATION

There’s one more lesson to be learned from the story of Rav Chiyah. By teaching the 11 children only one book each, these children knew they had to learn from one another. The Jewish people are one and we’re all in this together. Every person is worthy of profound respect, regardless of their beliefs and level of observance, and there is something to be learned from everyone.

We live in serious times. Whether it’s assimilation in America, or international forces pressing our holy city of Jerusalem, the message is essentially the same: The siege is on and the clock is ticking. We have to communicate the Torah message to our people. It is a matter of utmost national urgency.

We who believe in the power of Torah and the eternal mission of the Jewish people are required to act.
Who is responsible? We who believe in the power of Torah and the eternal mission of the Jewish people are required to act. To teach wisdom and be a "Light Unto the Nations."

On the Tenth of Tevet, when Nebuchadnezzar surrounded the city of Jerusalem, we did not get the message. Will we get the message now? Will we change? Will we wake up to reality?

You’ve got to care. If you don’t make the effort, you don’t care enough. You have powers. Are you going to use them?

We must get the message. Before the destruction. Now is the time.
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…..item 2)…. aish.com … The Tenth of Tevet … One day commemorates a variety of Jewish tragedies …
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img code photo … The Tenth of Tevet

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by Rabbi Berel Wein

January 5, 2012 / 10 Tevet 5772

www.aish.com/h/10t/48960111.html

The Tenth of Tevet is one of the four fast days that commemorate dark times in Jewish history. The others are Tisha B’Av (the day of the destruction of both Temples in Jerusalem), the 17th of Tammuz (the day of the breaching of the defensive wall of Jerusalem by Titus and the Roman legions in 70 CE), and the third of Tishrei (the day that marks the assassination of the Babylonian-appointed Jewish governor of Judah, Gedaliah ben Achikam. He was actually killed on Rosh Hashana but the fast day was advanced to the day after Rosh Hashana because of the holiday).

The Tenth of Tevet is viewed as such a severe and important fast day that it is observed even if it falls on a Friday.

The Tenth of Tevet marks the onset of the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, the King of Babylonia, and the beginning of the battle that ultimately destroyed Jerusalem and the Temple of Solomon, and sent the Jews into the 70-year Babylonian Exile. The date of the Tenth of Tevet is recorded for us by the prophet Yechezkel, who himself was already in Babylonia as part of the first group of Jews exiled there by Nebuchadnezzar, 11 years earlier than the actual destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem itself.

The Tenth of Tevet is viewed as such a severe and important fast day that it is observed even if it falls on a Friday (erev Shabbat), while our other fast days are so arranged by calendar adjustments as to never fall on a Friday, so as not to interfere with Shabbat preparations.

—– GREEK TRANSLATION

However, there are other commemorative days that fall immediately before the Tenth of Tevet and their memory has been silently incorporated in the fast day of the Tenth of Tevet as well. On the eighth of Tevet, King Ptolemy of Egypt forced 70 Jewish scholars to gather and translate the Hebrew Bible into Greek.
Even though the Talmud relates to us that this project was blessed with a miracle — the 70 scholars were all placed in separate cubicles and yet they all came up with the same translation — the general view of the rabbis of the time towards this project was decidedly negative. The Talmud records that when this translation became public "darkness descended on the world."

The ‘koshering’ of the Greek language by its use in translating the Hebrew Bible had wide ramifications in Jewish society.

This translation — the Septuagint — eventually became the basis for the Old Testament section of the Christian bible a few centuries later. The Greek translation of the Bible also further aided the advance of the agenda of the Hellenist Jews to bring Greek culture into Jewish life, and to attempt to reform Judaism in the image of Greek values and lifestyle. The "koshering" of the Greek language by its use in translating the Hebrew Bible had wide ramifications in Jewish society and undermined some of the efforts of the rabbis in combating the allure of Greece in Israel of then.

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—– DEATH OF EZRA THE SCRIBE

The ninth day of Tevet is held to be the day of the death of Ezra the Scribe. This great Jew is comparable even to Moses in the eyes of the Talmud. "If the Torah had not been granted through Moses, it could have been granted to Israel through Ezra." Ezra led the return of the Jews to Jerusalem from their Babylonian exile. It was under his direction and inspiration, together with the help of the court Jew, Nechemiah, that the Second Temple was built, albeit originally in a much more modest scale and style than the grandeur of Solomon’s Temple.

Ezra also renewed the covenant of Moses between Israel and God, staunched the flow of intermarriage that afflicted the Jews returning to Jerusalem, strengthened public and private Sabbath observance, and created the necessary schools and intellectual tools for the furtherance of the knowledge and development of the Oral Law of Sinai within the Jewish people.

A man of incorruptible character, great compassion, deep vision and erudition and inspirational charisma, Ezra the Scribe is responsible for the survival of Judaism and the Jews till this very day. It is no wonder therefore that Jews marked the day of his death as a sad day on the Jewish calendar. Since fasting on the eighth, ninth and 10th days of Tevet consecutively would be unreasonable, the events of the eighth and ninth were subsumed into the fast day of the Tenth of Tevet.

—– COMBINING DAYS

The rabbinic policy has been to attach other sad commemorations onto the established fast days, so as not to fill the calendar with so many days of sad remembrances. Thus the memorial for the destruction of the Jewish communities of Worms, Speyers and Mainz by the Crusaders in 1096 is marked on the fast day of Tisha B’Av, even though that destruction actually took place in other months.

This policy of minimizing the number of days of commemoration of sad events became accepted practice throughout the Jewish world until the Holocaust. However, the enormity of the tragedy of the Holocaust subsumed everything that preceded it in the story of the Jewish people in the Diaspora. Hence, it is understandable why the Knesset would look to designate a specific day alone for Holocaust remembrance. Nevertheless, the rabbinic policy of minimizing days of tragic remembrances played a role in assigning the Holocaust remembrance to the Tenth of Tevet for a large section of the Israeli population.

May we only commemorate days of goodness in our future.

About the Author
Rabbi Berel Wein

Berel Wein, the Founder and Director of The Destiny Foundation has, for over 20 years, been identified with the popularization of Jewish history through lectures worldwide, his more than 1000 audiotapes, books, seminars, educational tours and, most recently dramatic and documentary films.

Rabbi Wein has authored five Jewish History books – Triumph of Survival, The Story of the Jews in the Modern Era, Heralds of Destiny, the Medieval Era, Echoes of Glory, the Classical Era, and Faith and Fate, the story of the Jews in the Twentieth Century – all of which have received popular and critical acclaim. His newest book is The Oral Law of Sinai – An Illustrated History of the Mishnah Logic, Legend & Truth.

Rabbi Wein, a member of the Illinois Bar Association, is the recipient of the Educator of the Year Award from the Covenant Foundation in 1993. Most recently, Rabbi Wein received the Torah Prize Award from Machon Harav Frank in Jerusalem for his achievements in teaching Torah and spreading Judaism around the world. Rabbi Wein lives and teaches in Jerusalem.
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…..item 3)… Siege of Jerusalem (70) … From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia …

The siege ended with the sacking of the city and the destruction of its famous Second Temple. The destruction of both the first and second temples is still mourned annually as the Jewish fast Tisha B’Av. The Arch of Titus, celebrating the Roman sack of Jerusalem and the Temple, still stands in Rome.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Jerusalem_(70)

Josephus claims that 1,100,000 people were killed during the siege, of which a majority were Jewish, and that 97,000 were captured and enslaved, including Simon bar Giora and John of Giscala.[4]

"The slaughter within was even more dreadful than the spectacle from without. Men and women, old and young, insurgents and priests, those who fought and those who entreated mercy, were hewn down in indiscriminate carnage. The number of the slain exceeded that of the slayers. The legionaries had to clamber over heaps of dead to carry on the work of extermination."[5]

Many fled to areas around the Mediterranean. Titus reportedly refused to accept a wreath of victory saying, that the victory did not come through his own efforts but that he had merely served as an instrument of God’s wrath.[6]
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Holy Land Favorites – Christian Jewish Holy Land Gifts

www.HolyLandFavorites.com Holy Land Favorites offers Christian and Jewish Gifts for many occasions. For Christmas, Bar Mitzvah’s, Easter, Passover and more. Many different decorative and traditional gifts are available at Holy Land Favorites. Christian crosses made of olive wood and rosaries filled with Holy Water from the Jordan River are sure to make excellent Confirmation, Christmas, or house warming gifts. Jewish Holy Land items such as fancy Shabbat candlesticks, beautiful Star of David necklaces, or intricate Mezuzahs make wonderful gifts as well. Produced by Visible.net
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Jewish Menorah, Confucius statue, miniature axe, books on a shelf, MIRACLES: Past, Present, Future; science, art, religion, medicine, Wu Hsing Tao Acupuncture School, Seattle, Washington, USA

Jewish Menorah, Confucius statue, miniature axe, books on a shelf, MIRACLES: Past, Present, Future; science, art, religion, medicine, Wu Hsing Tao Acupuncture School, Seattle, Washington, USA
science and religion
Image by Wonderlane

Short, tragic life of Jewish writer comes out years later in her books

Short, tragic life of Jewish writer comes out years later in her books
Writer Irene Nemirovsky may very well be Ukraine’s undiscovered jewel. Born in Kyiv in 1903 and meeting her horrendous death 39 years later in the Nazi concentration camp of Auschwitz, Nemirovsky left a body of work that remains mostly a mystery.
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GR church gives out 500 hams
About 500 hams were given away for the holidays at New Life Christian Fellowship, the church’s pastor said Thursday.
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Christian group builds children’s home in Haiti
Bishop Al Gwinn’s job is mostly cerebral. It involves a lot of mediating and encouraging, preaching and convincing.
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KC area Jewish families emphasize Hanukkah’s spiritual aspects

KC area Jewish families emphasize Hanukkah’s spiritual aspects
Of course kids love the presents, but Hanukkah commemorates the first fight for religious freedom.
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Asheville area religion calendar
Submit faith-based events, special services at your place of worship or other religion-related happenings at CITIZEN-TIMES.com/submit, e-mail your events to Features Editor Bruce Steele at BSteele@CITIZEN-TIMES.com and Faith Reporter Carole Terrell at cterrell@citizen-times.com or fax them to 251-0585.
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Waco Jews celebrating Hanukkah
Jews in Waco and around the world have begun celebrating Hanukkah, a festive holiday.
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Jewish leader receives German civilian honor

Jewish leader receives German civilian honor
Tipping point? Netflix offers cheaper Internet-streaming plan to wean subscribers from DVDs More>>
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Starr report
Deidre Hall and current “Days of Our Lives” cast members Crystal Chappell and Shawn Christian will be on hand when Greg Meng and Eddie Campbell sign copies of their new book, “Days of Our Lives 45 Years: A Celebration in Photos.” It will be Meng and Campbell’s only New…
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Jewish leader receives German civilian honor
The German president has given one of the nation’s highest civilian honors to the outgoing head of Germany’s Central Council of Jews, praising her role in fighting extremism and anti-Semitism.
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The Jewish Targums and John’s Logos Theology

The Jewish Targums and John’s Logos Theology

At the beginning of his gospel, John refers to Jesus Christ as the logos–the `Word.’ Scholars have long debated the writer’s use of the term and its meaning for his understanding of Christ. Some suggest that the designation is imported from Greek thinking through the Jewish philosopher Philo. Others contend that the logos is drawn from the Old Testament Wisdom tradition or from passages in the Old Testament where God’s word is personalized.

Ronning makes a case that the Jewish Targums–interpretive translations of the Old Testament into Aramaic that were read in the synagogues in Palestine where John grew up–hold the key to understanding John’s concept of the logos. Examining numerous texts in the Fourth Gospel in light of the Targums, Ronning shows how connecting the logos with the Targumic concept of memra clarifies a host of theological themes that run throughout the Gospel, including Jesus’ “I am” sayings, the designation of Jesus as the “Son of Man,” the meaning of Jesus’ going to “prepare a place” for his followers, and Jesus’ role as bridegroom and lawgiver.

Heavily referenced to original documents and contemporary scholarship, Ronning’s impressive work will be welcomed by researchers in ancient language and New Testament studies. Includes modern author, ancient sources, and subject indices.

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